Archive for August 28th, 2019|Daily archive page

Poetry

At Dad’s memorial service, my sister Laura read a poem she had written in February 1994. By this time, Dad had been hospitalized for several months, waiting for a donor heart. And my niece Julia, Laura’s daughter, selected a poem to read for the service. I have been meaning to share them here for some time.

THE WAITING
by Laura Caldwell

Everywhere I look I see your heart.
It’s pulsating on the stove in the meat sauce
marinating with sugar and cumin to fill
my children’s plates and stomachs.
And woven into a wool muffler it
circles my daughter before it shapes
my lips as they kiss the rose on her cheeks.
Imprinted in the gauze of a band-aid
stuck to my skin, it continues to
dress subtle abrasions and inflamed wounds.
So solidly are your arteries built
into the bricks of my mantel, I cannot imagine
that blinking embers could still.
If only I could collect all of these
hearts, graft them into a valentine and
deliver them to your sterilized room,
Maybe then your new heart would come.

Written February 14, 1994. Dad received his heart 10 days later, on Feb. 24, 1994.



TRAIN RIDE
by Ruth Stone

All things come to an end;
small calves in Arkansas,
the bend of the muddy river.
Do all things come to an end?
No, they go on forever.
They go on forever, the swamp,
the vine-choked cypress, the oaks
rattling last year’s leaves,
the thump of the rails, the kite,
the still white stilted heron.
All things come to an end.
The red clay bank, the spread hawk,
the bodies riding this train,
the stalled truck, pale sunlight, the talk;
the talk goes on forever,
the wide dry field of geese,
a man stopped near his porch
to watch. Release, release;
between cold death and a fever,
send what you will, I will listen.
All things come to an end.
No, they go on forever.

from In the Next Galaxy © Copper Canyon Press, 2002 

 

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